The awesomeness of Snæfellsnes

On the southern coast of the Snæfellsnes peninsula, a pair of cliffs named Lóndrangar give home to local birds (not to mention the elves;) and have inspired many tourists, painters and photographers.  The cliffs are volcanic plugs, formed when sturdy basalt rock, hardened within the vent of an ancient volcanic crater, remained erect after the softer lava eroded away.  The rock of the hill Svalþúfa in the foreground is thought to have formed the rim of the crater, but the sea has claimed the rest.

The taller cliff is believed to have been first ascended in 1735, and remains a challenging climb.  A noteworthy selection of birds inhabit the cliffs, including Fulmars, Guillemots and Black-legged Kittiwake.  Watch out for the fulmars, they like to vomit on aggressive bird-watchers, but the other ones are rather friendly.

Lóndrangar are on the southern edge of the national park surrounding the towering glacier-topped 700,000 year old volcano Snæfellsjökull at the end of the peninsula.  Be sure to see the wonders of Snæfellsnes on your trip to Iceland, and contact me and Iurie Belegurschi for photo tours.

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