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GeoSea Geothermal Baths百科及旅行攻略

4.6
766 个谷歌 评价
类别
Hot Springs
地点
Vitaslóð 1, 640, 640 Húsavík, Iceland
营业时间
12:00 - 22:00
距离市中心
0.9 km
适合家庭
评价
4.6
评价总数
766

GeoSea offers one of the best geothermal bath experiences in Iceland.The GeoSea Geothermal Sea Baths is a world-class geothermal spa in North Iceland that features naturally-heated seawater and a stunning view of the North Atlantic sea.

Tourists exploring the town of Husavik, whether on trips such as a whale-watching tour or a 3-Day North Iceland Private Tour, can easily bathe in the geothermal spa because of its convenient location. Booking admission to GeoSea to make your trip more relaxing.

GeoSea is an excellent alternative to other hot springs in the land of fire and ice due to its saltwater. With its fantastic infinity pools overlooking the calm sea, visitors to the area can expect to have an unforgettable vacation experience.


Photo from Admission to the Relaxing Geosea Geothermal Baths in Husavik.


About GeoSea Geothermal Sea Baths

North Iceland’s geothermal sea baths, popularly known as GeoSea, is an up-and-coming attraction in the scenic town of Husavik. The Icelandic nature bath may have just opened in 2018, but it’s already popular with locals and foreign tourists.

The hot pools of Husavik are home to geothermally-heated waters with reinvigorating natural minerals, suitable for any skin type or condition. Locals revere these geothermal pools because they can potentially relax muscles and improve circulation.

Likewise, they’re an escape from Iceland’s chilly weather.

Physical Features and Facilities of GeoSea

Unlike other geothermal pools in the country, such as the Blue Lagoon and Myvatn Nature Baths, GeoSea features mineral-rich seawater. 

Geothermal boreholes heat the water to a comfortable temperature between 100 F (38 C) to 102 F (39 C) year-round.

GeoSea features three beautiful infinity pools of different properties and proportions that can accommodate many visitors simultaneously. 

The largest pool overlooks Skjalfandi bay and has a slightly lower temperature than the other two pools. Because of the great view of the sea and the cliff, it is the most frequented spot in the attraction.

Meanwhile, the uppermost pool remains at an average temperature, and the smaller third one offers the warmest water. 

The infinitiy pools provide an illusion that you are part of a more extensive natural landscape rather than removed from it.

Furthermore, the pools and buildings feature black lava rock and gray slate stone, inspired by Iceland's nature.

A steam room is also available for guests to use before or after dipping in the water.

Guests must shower before wearing a swimsuit and entering the pools. You can rent swimsuits and towels from the facility if you don’t have your own. 

Moreover, the North Iceland attraction includes a swim-up bar and restaurant, where you can buy alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks. 

GeoSea is open throughout the year but with varying opening times. It opens from around 11:00 to 23:00 during summer and 17:00 to 22:00 from January to March.

History of the Geothermal Sea Baths

The geothermal sea baths of Husavik formally opened to tourists in August of 2018, but before it was developed into an attraction, the locals had different plans.

The town initially looked into geothermal energy to heat homes a century ago. Workers drilled a hole that released seawater unsuitable for that purpose because it was too rich in minerals. Then another shelved plan was to make cheese with the water. 

Eventually, Icelanders decided to use the water for hot springs, an idea aligned with Iceland’s cultural heritage. The springs bring locals together to discuss everyday events, providing a source of cultural enrichment. 

What to See at the GeoSea Geothermal Baths

Coastal Location and Beautiful Views at GeoSea

The entire structure of GeoSea sits beautifully on the Husavikurhofdi cliffside. This position creates an immersive view of the Icelandic coasts for visitors and locals to enjoy.

These geothermal sea baths provide an all-encompassing view of the picturesque Skjalfandi bay/ You might even see whales and dolphins roaming around the bay if you’re lucky enough during your visit.

On the left side of the attraction, you will see a bright yellow lighthouse called Husavikurviti lighthouse. The lighthouse remains active today.

Geothermal Sea Baths overlooking a lighthouse.

Photo from Regina Hronn Ragnarsdottir.

Towering mountains also surround Husavik and the Icelandic geothermal pools. To the west, you can see the snow-capped Kinnarfjoll and Viknafjoll mountains, while if you face north, the freezing Arctic Circle is on the horizon. Luckily, you can enjoy these sights without leaving the warmth of the springs. 

The Northern Lights of Iceland

GeoSea lies on a cliff 161 feet (49 meters) above sea level, providing a great vantage point to see the northern lights. It’s possible to see these colorful lights in Iceland for eight months annually, from September to April, whenever the sky is dark and clear.

There are also other northern lights tour packages you can join outside Husavik, such as from the nearby town of Akureyri. The tour guides on these trips, such as on this small-group northern lights hunt from Akureyri, are experienced light hunters, so you don’t have to worry about finding them on your own. 

Traveling to GeoSea and Husavik

There are plenty of ways to reach the geothermal sea baths, from land to air transportation. While taking a flight from Reykjavik is the fastest option, traveling on land is the best way to explore more of Iceland’s beautiful nature.

You can fly with Eagle Air, an airline that offers flights from Reykjavik Airport to Husavik. These flights occur multiple times a week and only last an hour.

If driving, the attraction is 288 miles (464 kilometers) from Reykjavik. To make the most out of your stay in the Nordic country, you may join self-drive tours that include the Diamond Circle and North Iceland, such as this unforgettable 7-day North Iceland self-drive holiday tour.

If you stay in the town for multiple days, Husavik has all the amenities you need, from shops to accommodations

Activities and Attractions near the GeoSea Geothermal Baths

Aside from the GeoSea Baths, there are plenty of activities for every traveler in Husavik and the northern region of Iceland. 

Iceland is one of the best places to experience whale watching.

Puffin and Whale Watching Tours

The most popular tour in Husavik is a whale watching tour, especially during the summer months. The Skjalfandi bay of the town is a favorite among aquatic animals because of its fertile waters.

Suppose you join whale watching tours in Iceland, whether a typical small-group whale watching excursion or a more traditional 3.5-Hour whale watching tour on a sailboat, you will see different marine species.  

The most common sight on these trips is the dramatic humpback whale, but you are also likely to see minke whales, white-beaked dolphins, and harbor porpoises. You might even catch a glimpse of a massive blue whale, orca, sperm whale, or pilot whale.

On the other hand, if you prefer bird watching, you may also join puffin-watching tours from Husavik. The island of Grimsey, also known to some locals as the Puffin island, is just off the coast of Husavik.

Thousands of Atlantic puffins nest on the island from May to August, making a perfect spot for an unforgettable birdwatching adventure.

The GeoSea sea baths are a perfect place to rest after these activities. 

Exploring the Diamond Circle

Husavik is just one of the many attractions along the Diamond Circle, a sightseeing route that spans 160 miles (260 kilometers). Lake Myvatn, Dettifoss waterfall, and Asbyrgi canyon are the three other main attractions along the tourist route.

Lake Myvatn, spelled Mývatn in Icelandic, is a gorgeous volcanic lake with several beautiful pseudo-craters. The lake features mesmerizing wildlife, including 13 species of nesting ducks, and is home to the famous Myvatn Nature Baths.

Next on the trip is the Dettifoss waterfall. As the most powerful waterfall in Europe, this natural marvel has an average water flow of 6,816 cubic feet (193 cubic meters) per second. The waterfall stretches 330 feet (100 meters) wide. 

To the north of the waterfall is another scenic attraction called Asbyrgi canyon. The geological wonder is a horseshoe-shaped canyon that boasts incredible greenery and views.

An old Nordic tale attributes the landmark’s creation to the god Odin's eight-legged horse.

You may visit these spectacular North Iceland attractions by joining self-drive tours like this 7-Day Ring Road Self-Drive Tour or guided tours like this 10-Day Guided Package with Reykjavik.